What’s On: September 2021

Image by Ferg Campbell

A bit of a disappointing ending to last month with Covid rearing its ugly head again, but hopefully we can slowly start emerging from lockdown very soon. In the meantime, a reminder that we’ll be running ALL DPS activities online until we’re back at Level 1, just to be on the safe side. This means that some activities may need to be cancelled or postponed, and all club meetings will be held on Zoom until then – keep an eye on government announcements if you’re not sure where we’re at 🙂 Covid Alert Levels and Updates

DateActivityDetailsLocation
7:30pm, Monday 6 September  View Finder #12: Esther Bunning – NZ Pacific Studio ANZAC Flags project Zoom
7:30pm, Monday 13 September  Club meeting: Noelle Bennett – Rules? What rules?  Projected Image Of The Month: Edges  Zoom  
Saturday 18 September  Festival judging   Zoom  
7:30pm, Monday 20 September  Focus group meetings   Zoom and various  
6pm, Thursday 23 SeptemberField Trip: Glenfalloch Night Garden N.B. THIS WILL ONLY RUN IF WE ARE AT LEVEL 1Meet at 6pm towards the Strathallan Street end of the Bunnings carpark, to catch the free bus to GlenfallochGlenfalloch
7:30pm, Monday 27 September  Club meeting: AGM
Neale McGowan: Postcards of Old Dunedin
Phil Hollard: A First for New Zealand  
Print Of The Month: Open  Zoom (or if at Level 1: Mornington Presbyterian Community Centre, 16 Maryhill Tce)  
TBCField Trip: Monarch Wildlife CruiseAll details TBC – an email will be sent out when they are confirmed 
  • Nicola

What’s On: August 2021

Wildings by Nicola Pye
DateActivityDetailsLocation
7:30pm, Monday 2 August  View Finder #11: Paul Hughson – Real estate photography in Norway Zoom
7:30pm, Monday 9 August  Club meeting: Stuart Clook – Alternative Photographic Processes – the art and practise of the handmade photographic print  Print Of The Month: Open
Appraised by Paul Sorrell        
Mornington Presbyterian Community Centre, 16 Maryhill Tce  
7:30pm, Monday 16 AugustFocus group meetings   Zoom and various  
Saturday 21 – Wednesday 25 AugustPrint ExhibitionSelectors: Karen Lawton (Open) and John Hart (Natural History)Moved to Zoom  
7:30pm, Monday 23 August  Club meeting: Meeting at Dunedin Community Gallery  Projected Image Of The Month: Flow  Dunedin Community Gallery, 20 Princes St, Dunedin CBD  
1pm, Sunday 29 AugustField Trip: Taieri Historical Society and MuseumMeet at: -12:15pm at the Bayfield Inlet to carpool
– or at the Wobbly Goat at 1pm for a pre-photo coffee
– or at 2pm at the little museum
Bring $5 cash per person for museum donations
Outram area
Sept/Oct TBCField Trip: Monarch Wildlife CruiseAll details TBC – an email will be sent out when they are confirmed the ocean
  • Nicola

Photo Walk: Scavenger Hunt, May 2021

We recently had a Scavenger Hunt photo walk around the University campus, where participants were given a list of 12 topics to inspire their photos at the start of the walk. The plan had originally been to take these photos anywhere between Dunedin and Lawrence over a few hours, but the weather was so wet that we decided to stick to somewhere where we could find shelter quickly! We hope you enjoy the results.

  • Nicola

Astrophotography and Field Trip

The NatMAT group have organised an Astrophotography trip, open to all members, which should be a great night out! Judith Swann has also put together some very handy information to look through before the night, so have a read and start preparing 💫⭐✨

Image by Trevor Douglas

When: Meeting at 1800h on Saturday 12th June 2021 depending on the cloud cover. We will have another look at the weather on Saturday morning and if we need to cancel we’ll let you know, otherwise see you Saturday evening.

Where: Aramoana. Meet at the memorial carpark. Hereabouts: https://what3words.com/waterfalls.goalie.hubcap.

Moon, sun and tide.

The new moon is on the 10th June, so on the 11th and 12th it will still be basically moonless and dark. On the 11th and 12th sunset is at 1658h; moonset is at 1718h and 1805h; and the tide will be falling. High tide is at 1520h and 1600h.

What photos could I take?

Stars – https://www.flickr.com/photos/emmakey/34495994481
Star trails – https://www.flickr.com/photos/joedsilva/6132188906
Milky Way – https://www.southproud.co.nz/listing/aramoana-beach/
Foreground
Light painting
Reflections (in the wet sand)

How do I take these images?

You keep yourself and those around you SAFE

Dark – It will be DARK

Safety: Think about your safety. Bring a RED LIGHT torch our eyes take longer to adjust to the dark after looking at white light compared to red light. It is also very easy to get temporarily blinded by white light. Put fresh batteries in your torch. Remember Sea Lions use the sand and they don’t leave just because it is dark! Check before you take a step backwards.
Lights: Folks around you may NOT want your torch on just so you can make adjustments to your camera. Practice beforehand so you can change your camera settings by touch. Talk to each other about putting lights on.
Focus: Focusing in the dark is really hard. Find out if your camera will do focus magnification and turn it on. Teach yourself how to turn on manual focus by touch! On site, find a star and manually focus on it until it is crisp pin point of light.

Cold – More than likely it will be COLD

Layers: Taking astro photos can involve quite a lot of standing around, in the cold, doing very little. You will get cold. Wear some warm layers, bring more, including a wind-proof layer. Hat, scarf, gloves, chemical hand warmer pouches, something to sit or kneel on if you think you’ll need it.
Camera & Batteries: Your camera gear will get cold, and cold batteries don’t work so well. Take some spare batteries and keep the spares in a warm pocket. Putting a cold camera into a warm car risks inducing condensation inside the lens and/or camera. A Ziploc plastic bag or dry-bag with a silica gel sachet in and a plan to warm up your camera slowly will reduce this risk. (https://www.photographymad.com/pages/view/how-to-protect-your-digital-camera-in-cold-weather)

Movement – The subject (the sky) moves and your camera is at risk of movement

Subject movement: Actually it is the earth that is moving (turning) while the sky stays still! We perceive this as the stars moving. Photographing this movement is how you get star trails. If you want points of light for stars your exposure time needs to be less than about 25 seconds.
Camera movement: The long exposure time means you have to hold your camera completely still so a tripod, bean bag or similar is essential. Remember your cable release, or work out how to use the timer on your camera. Work this out in the light and warmth of home before you set out.

Stars / Milky Way

https://www.capturelandscapes.com/how-to-photograph-stars/
https://digital-photography-school.com/beginners-tips-for-night-sky-and-star-photography/
https://www.nikonusa.com/en/learn-and-explore/a/tips-and-techniques/photographing-the-night-sky.html

These articles are good backgrounders to taking images of the stars. Read about wide open aperture (f/4 or lower if you can get), higher ISO (1600 and up), longer exposure times (10 – 30 seconds), and white balance to 3200Kelvin (if you can). Then also read the pros and cons of each of these variables in this situation.

Star Trails

https://nightskypix.com/how-to-photograph-star-trails/
https://www.lightstalking.com/how-to-photograph-star-trails/
https://learnandsupport.getolympus.com/learn-center/photography-tips/astrophotography/astrophotography-101

Star trails use very similar settings but are taken for longer so your camera captures the movement of the stars OR you take a number of star photos and stack them together to make the star trails.

Milky Way

The techniques and settings for stars usually work for the Milky Way as well. One difference is learning where the Milky Way will be, at the location you’ll be at and at the time you’ll be there.
The videos on this site (https://www.davemorrowphotography.com/p/tutorial-shooting-night-sky.html) describe using free apps and programmes (Blue Marble, The Photographers Ephemeris (TPE), Google Maps, Stellarium) to work out where the Milky Way will be.
The Milky Way should be just to the seaward side of Taiaroa Head at about 1900-1930h on the 111th and 12th June.

Light Painting

https://digital-photography-school.com/add-more-interest-astrophotography-with-light-painting/
Bring along an led light source (torch, head lamp, panel) so you can add some more light in the foreground.

Aurora

http://www.aurora-service.net/aurora-school/how-to-photograph-the-aurora/
Just in case!!!

More details?

Have a look at these sites.

Stars:
https://www.davemorrowphotography.com/p/tutorial-shooting-night-sky.html

Star Trails:
https://www.davemorrowphotography.com/2012/03/StarTrailsPhotographyTutorial.html
https://www.photopills.com/articles/star-trails-photography-guide#step5

Milky Way:
https://www.photopills.com/articles/milky-way-photography-guide

NatMAT and friends head to Moeraki

The 14 Nov saw some 17(!) photographers pile out of cars at Katiki Point lighthouse into a clear, sunny, and warm afternoon. The plan: photographing around the Katiki Nature Reserve, fish and chips at The Fishwife in Moeraki, then on to Moeraki boulders. Some folks chose to stop at Shag Point on their way home, they found a grand spot for a specific visit!

Walking around the reserve and headland led to images of photographers, fisherpeople, sea gulls, shags, penguins, terns, plants, insects, landscapes, and more. We were entertained with seal antics, in the water and on the rocks; the fishermen and their catches; and lots of birds in flight.

The general consensus seems to be The Fishwife dishes up some of the best blue cod around!

Then on to the beach and fun with jumping and pushing and sitting and running with the boulders. Some long exposures, reflections, and shadows. Those at Shag Point found barnacles, rocks, rock pools, sea weeds, star fish, more rock jumping, and more landscapes.

A fabulous afternoon, and evening, out with friends and photos …

  • Judith Swan

Focus Groups: NatMAT

Thanks to Judith for putting this together for us recently – looks like the NatMAT group has been a hive of activity!

Themes and Fieldtrips

What has the Nature – Macro – Astro – Timelapse (NatMAT) focus group been doing??

Well, we started with a chat and found out we were keen on photographing pretty much anything ‘outside’, taking part in field trips, and learning from our colleagues. So with those things in mind we set up a field trip to the Botanic Gardens.

The aim was to take some macro images. We had a beautiful afternoon of sunshine with nearly a dozen of us finding bees, weevils, flowers (especially yellow flowers!), yellow and black bugs, and some fungi. These images got critiqued at our next face-to-face meeting, and we learnt good ideas from each other.

Then COVID-19 came along and turned the world upside down!

Nature-Macro pivoted to online! We decided to meet once a week (Sunday evening) using the DPS Zoom room, sharing images based on a theme.

We started with ‘My Garden Inhabitants’ which showed up some skills within our group. We’ve challenged ourselves with birds, water, focus stacking (after Ged shared some techniques for focus stacking), fungi, insects (after a DPS presentation on insect photography), ‘creative nature’ (after some ideas from Tulipa), astro/stars, and always open.

As soon as we moved to level 1 Nature-Macro scheduled a field trip!!

In mid July another dozen or so of us arrived at Yellowhead, Broad Bay, again on a stunningly clear beautiful afternoon with a low tide. We enjoyed a wonderful slow stroll around the point with images of birds, krill, harbour, sky, boats, and lots of the cliff face. All supported with lots of chat, catching up, and friendships – new and old.

Our club colleagues from the Astro-Timelapse focus group opted to come along and join in. As the group size expanded, so did our name!!

More recently, we’ve learnt from Karen about the different twilights, and the transition from light to dark. We’ve challenged ourselves to use that learning with astro and twilight themes. More trips and themes have included Purakanui, birds in flight, green, weather, asymmetry, black and white, and Aramoana.

This week we’re working on spring images, thinking about other things we’d like to do, and hoping for a nice enough weekend to visit Aramoana. If any of this sounds like you, please come along – DPS Zoom room, Sunday, 7:30pm.

Here are some of the images that we’ve taken and shared and learnt from:


This slideshow requires JavaScript.

  • Judith

What’s on in July

july

  • Monday 9th July: Club meeting
    DPS Print Circle, 7pm at Mornington Presbyterian Centre (just before club meeting)
    Speakers: 20 images in 10 minutes from several DPS members
    Print of the Month theme: Open, selector, Craig McKenzie
  • Tuesday 17th July: Midweek Photo Group
  • Monday 23rd July: Club meeting
    Speaker: Kelly Lindsay, Food Photography.
    Projected Image of the Month theme: City Skylines, selector Craig McKenzie
  • 28th or 29th July: Challenge photo walk with special invite for Facebook members
  • Monday 30th July: Judging Critique workshop

Sutton Salt Lake trip report

Ian1Almost a dozen DPS members met at the railway station in warm sunny conditions two
weeks ago. Our drivers took us out past Outram to Lake Mahinerangi. First we took some overviews of the lake and village working with gently windswept tussock grasses for foreground interest. Next stop nearby was the Canton stamping battery used 100 years back to extract gold from quartz rocks. Lots of rust and lichens to add texture to our shots.

Ian2After a quick drive to Middlemarch caffeine levels were restored and we were ready for the 20 minute walk into Sutton Salt Lake. This was cleverly timed so we arrived just before sunset and the unusual rocky landscape of schist torrs was enhanced by the long shadows. There was only a little water in the lake which is the only salt lake in NZ fed by rain only and no streams in or out. Ian3

The sunset itself was not so dramatic but with a full moon rising over hills to the north east and lake reflections there was plenty of exciting photography to be done.

We made good time home in the dark and would like to thank our organisers and drivers for an interesting and satisfying afternoon.

Text and images by Ian Thomson


[Video] Recent Events

We always try to have at least one photowalk or field trip each month and when we get back we like to share a selection of photos taken on the trip – to entice other members to join us on the next trip!  Here are the slideshows from some recent trips (and a workshop).

Vogel Street Party photowalk: 8/10/16

Light Workshop, starting at Queens Gardens: 31/10/16

Overnight field trip to Quarantine Island/Kamau Taurua: 12-13/11/16 http://quarantineisland.org.nz/

DPS – Routeburn Field Trip July 2016

Participants: Craig McKenzie, Glenn Symon, David Steer, Jenny Longstaff

Article written by Jenny

Hooray! End of the working week and let’s get outta here! Arrived at Sylvan campsite (60+km beyond Glenorchy) by about 10.30pm and erected our tents under the trees to keep out of the hoar frost zone. Seemed to be several other campers tucked away too, plus deer. Hot cuppa brewed and so to bed, snugly tucked up in several layers and sleeping with camera to keep battery warm (I only had the one battery, unlike Craig who had 10!).

rosy-fingered dawn / beckons early riser / cupping a tin mug

Caterer Craig’s cordon bleu fare provided nourishment then off to the start of the Routeburn Track. The guys were lugging their tramping packs, camera bags and tripods, signalling  a serious photographic expedition, while my camera gear is a small point and shoot waterproof camera (not that I have ever used it underwater, but on a South Island tramping trip you never know!!). I was on the trip mainly for the tramping and was delighted to discover that it triggered some poetic notebook scribblings, as you shall see interspersed in this account.

green therapy / nature’s healing touch / in the balm of your land

The track itself and bridge crossings are very well constructed, the Routeburn Track being designated a Great Walk. Our destination for Saturday night was the Routeburn Falls hut, (capacity 48), so with plenty of time to get there and only 8 or so km to walk, we could dawdle beside the picturesque river, photographing the beech forest, ferns, waterfalls, mossy rocks and other forest details, with some kakariki, south island robins, tom tits and riflemen for company.

inquisitive visitors / tiny bush birds / strut their fluff

We took a lunch break at an old landslip site which afforded great views across to the Humboldt Mountains, then eventually we arrived at the Falls Hut, dumped our things then out again to explore the Falls area, rich pickings for compositions of rocks and water, foliage, mountain scenery and atmospherics. The weather was holding well, so I continued along the track until I could get a view of Lake Harris.

focused photographer / captures panorama / exposure on the summit

The evening was spent consuming Chef Craig’s candle-lit dinner and huddling over a reluctant wood burner. (The next morning he discovered the water tank and the coal shed.) We had chatted to some other trampers on the track, but the only other people staying at the hut were two young Invercargill women. Tough kiwis go winter tramping!

crumbling erosion / swirling tannin waters / dunking gingernuts

And then it rained all night. A deluge. No point getting up early. Later in the morning in typically fickle style it cleared and we ventured out at 11-ish, spending time checking out the waterfalls, gushing most spectacularly, before we descended to the lower valley for other riverside photo stops, with a lunch break at the Routeburn Flats hut.

raging river / chuting the rapids / canyon clefts

The rain had woken up all the tiny lichens and mosses and had turned the river and side streams into torrents, but we were relatively dry on our hike out.

washed clean / forest greens gleam / radiant after rain

It was a pretty good outing for photographic variety, from wide angle vista to macro minutiae, and best part on a tramping excursion with fellow photographers is that they don’t pick on you to keep up! Back at the vehicle it was good to shed our packs and get out of our boots, then we did a side trip to photograph ‘the Paradise tree’. A great weekend away, proving that you can cram a lot into a short space of time, creating memorable moments.

tongues hanging out / waiting by back door / muddy hiking boots